Copperband with neurological or vision problem

Paul B

paul b
This (about) 10 year old copperband normally will eat all the clams you give him. But for the last few months he misses the food 9 out of 10 times.
In this video he gets one piece but misses all others. He aims short almost every time.

I am sure it is neurological and can't be fixed. Fish get tumors and cancers just as we do and you can't fix everything.

 

CAPSLOCK

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Moderator
BRS Member
So is 10yrs about the expectancy for a copperband, do you think?

He made out better than 98.67% of copperbands in aquariums either way.
 

Paul B

paul b
I am not sure of the life span of a copperband and I have had a few live about ten years but none longer. He doesn't appear to be old and I would "guess" a fish such as a copperband should live to about 15 or more years so I would consider 10 years a dismal failure. But again I am guessing.

In my experience, something always happens to them after that time.
People have problems with copperbands because they insist on quarantining them and not feeding them what they are supposed to eat, like worms which is the main part of their diet in the sea.

He only looks middle aged to me. :cool:
 

Paul B

paul b
I am not certain on the age of my Copperband with the neurological problem because I am hardly certain of my age. She could be 8 or 18. :confused:(I could be 50 or 82)
I get fish, throw them in my tank and go out to dinner for some calamari and maybe try the Merlot.

Yesterday I bought an anthius. I already forgot what kind of anthius it is but I don't think I ever had one of these and I got him in a store which I don't like because I don't get a discount there and don't like the place. It is also filthy and the people working there seem like they would rather be working at Burger King running the French Fry machine. :p

My wife had a Dr. appointment near there and I go there to kill time because in her Doctors office the only magazines they have are Golf Digest and Pregnancy Today. Two books that I have always wanted to read but since they have those same two books for the three years we have been going there, I already read them.

The fish was 80 bucks and I probably could have gotten it in another place for $50.00 or less. But I was there and the fish kind of looked at me and caught my attention so I had to take him home.

(I will remember the name probably in August)
Of course I threw it in the tank and he is now behind the rocks but should be out today. (or last night he became bristle worm food)
Like usual I had the guy in the store feed him as I asked him to.

I asked what they feed him and he said flakes. I said, Do you feed your kids flakes? I want to see him eat something else so he threw in some frozen stuff which the fish ate.

It's a thick looking anthius with a reddish design on it's face sort of like an American Indian Mohican,
Or Native American Mohican, whatever is PC, I don't know. I myself am Italian, Sicilian actually but I was born in Brooklyn so I am American. I don't feel bad if you call me one of the many Italian slurs as I am not a snowflake, but you may wake up with a seahorse head in bed next to you. :eek:;Meh
 

Paul B

paul b
I have been searching for information on the lifespan of copperband butterflies and it seems that ten years isn't bad.
I have also read that they are very hard to keep (which I totally disagree with).

I also read their lifespan is between 4-7 years. Then I read an informative article about them that says they live about ten years. Then I realized that I wrote that article so it doesn't help me.

I think a fish of that size should live about 15 years, of course I am guessing but maybe thats it. I have had many of them but I don't remember ever keeping them over ten years. They don't get sick, they normally just stop eating at about that age.

Mine wants to eat, it just can't focus on the food and misses almost 100% of the time so maybe that is her lifespan. If it is, I am happy. If it isn't, then she is not happy. :rolleyes:
 

scavdog

Well-Known Member
BRS Member
Officer
They don't get sick, they normally just stop eating at about that age.
Interesting observation. Scott Michael's claimed the record in captivity was 10 years. His angelfish & butterfly book is a few years old, but I can't imagine they live longer than 15-20.

Copperbands were notorious for dropping dead. Most sudden death was linked cyanide poisoning from poor collection practices.

At one time - some years back - it was well know that the Australian collected CBBF was the most ethically and likely to survive. Does anyone know if this is still generally the case. Personally, I have had both Raccoons and CBBF with great success.
 

Paul B

paul b
I don't usually have a problem with copperbands and I really think much of the problems with them is that people try to quarantine them. Copperbands hate that.
My copperband used to eat like this.

 

Paul B

paul b
It doesn't work. He comes to the food and tries to grab it but he keeps missing and aims a little off to the side. He is frustrated, but old.
 

Paul B

paul b
My copperband hasn't eaten on over a week but still looks perfect and hunts food all day even though she can't figure out how to bite it. Healthy fish can go for weeks or even months without eating. Copperbands can't go that long because they are not a really fat, lethargic fish.

Soon she will slow down and lose the sheen on her scales, her eyes will dull and she will become disoriented.

I would like to buy another small one, maybe with a similar size long nosed butterfly but my copperband doesn't play well with other butterflies so I will have to wait until she dies.

She is a large, striking fish and I will miss her but I think she lived a full life. I won't necropsy her because without a CAT-fish scan, I an quite sure I won't find anything wrong with her and it is very hard to study the brain on such a fish. I doubt I would be able to pick out a brain tumor or Parkensons either. :rolleyes:
 

Chris A.

Formally toomanyfish
BRS Member
Officer
It’s the circle of life. You can only help it until that time comes. Keeping fish as long as you do is amazing and the fish know it
 

Paul B

paul b
Never quarantine them. Never medicate them. Never keep them in a tank with artificial structures or PVC.
Only feed them clams or live worms, maybe with a little mysis and don't try to give them pellets or anything freeze dried.

Make sure they are eating in the store and read this:

 

TJ Reefer

Formerly Known as FishFail
BRS Member
Never quarantine them. Never medicate them. Never keep them in a tank with artificial structures or PVC.
Only feed them clams or live worms, maybe with a little mysis and don't try to give them pellets or anything freeze dried.

Make sure they are eating in the store and read this:

Thanks. I do have PVC piping for my snowflake. Oh well, the article makes it sound possible. Where do yo buy your Copperbands maybe I will try again if I clean out the PVC.
 

gobyvin

Non-member
Paul, That stinks. I hope your pal doesn’t suffer long. We are going through the same thing with my son’s fish. No way out, not getting better. I hope you can find a good one to try another decade long friendship when the time is right. Your advice on how to keep these successfully is spot on. Your approach at keeping sealife in captivity is excellent. Observation and common sense go a long way. If so many that get into the business side of this industry weren’t interested in selling stuff then misinformation on proper husbandry would be reduced. Merry Christmas too!!!
 

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