Self morphed montipora?

#24
Thank you @aresangel

http://www.reefcentral.com/forums/showthread.php?t=2526030

The above is the quickest thread I can find. It is over 4 years old and it bears noting that if you search further you'll find photographed accounts etc of folks that have observed color changes, based on his methods, although he does not assert that in this specific thread. It also bears noting that in these instances the anemones host zooanthellae was typically severely depleted. Zooanthellae in and of themselves (to my understanding back then, I'm not so sure now) do not lend color. Anyway... lots of good information with some of the folks playing with nems several years ago.

There is also a very interesting article here... (referenced in the above thread)

http://biostor.org/reference/10788
 

this is me

I like turtles
BRS Member
#25
Thank you @aresangel

http://www.reefcentral.com/forums/showthread.php?t=2526030

The above is the quickest thread I can find. It is over 4 years old and it bears noting that if you search further you'll find photographed accounts etc of folks that have observed color changes, based on his methods, although he does not assert that in this specific thread. It also bears noting that in these instances the anemones host zooanthellae was typically severely depleted. Zooanthellae in and of themselves (to my understanding back then, I'm not so sure now) do not lend color. Anyway... lots of good information with some of the folks playing with nems several years ago.

There is also a very interesting article here... (referenced in the above thread)

http://biostor.org/reference/10788
I was afraid you would cite that thread. That thread is a wishful theory that feeding a bleached gigantea another healthy gigantean tentacle containing zooxanthellae would bring back the color pigment of the bleached anemone. It has nothing to do with color morphing. To my best knowledge, unless the two different color gignatea sperm/egg combine in such a way that both color can be morph into each other, there's no way you can just "create" a rainbow or whatever you call it anemone.
I also would not feed a bleached anemone with another anemone body parts wishing that it would recover.
 

dz6t

Acro Garden, BRS Sponsor
BRS Member
#26
In the thread, the original poster, was trying to do Zooxanthellae transplant to save a bleached anemone. Which in theory it is possible. Coral and anemone do have the ability to recapture symbiosis algae after bleach events in the wild. I guess it can happen in captive environment as well . Also aquaculture coral do show changes in algae clays to favor photosynthesis.



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#27
I was afraid you would cite that thread. That thread is a wishful theory that feeding a bleached gigantea another healthy gigantean tentacle containing zooxanthellae would bring back the color pigment of the bleached anemone. It has nothing to do with color morphing. To my best knowledge, unless the two different color gignatea sperm/egg combine in such a way that both color can be morph into each other, there's no way you can just "create" a rainbow or whatever you call it anemone.
I also would not feed a bleached anemone with another anemone body parts wishing that it would recover.
Well darn. I'd gotten out of the hobby for a few years since then, but still read quite a bit, and was under the impression that quite a few reputable people have done the zoo transplants (myself included.) That's disappointing. I wouldn't hesitate to introduce zooanthellae to a severely bleached anemone. Give it every chance for survival possible. My blue gig was so sticky that if I inadvertently touched it while maintaining the tank there would be several tentacles stuck to me afterward. Easy donation. Why not, if the donor anemone is healthy? Cannibalism in sea creatures is perfectly normal.

These are the same folks that began methodical treatments for imported gigs and drastically raised the survival rate. I personally observed a super light (bleached) lime green gig exhibit a bluish sheen after we introduced blue tentacles within it's food. Granted the gig may have just regained it's biological color as it regained health and it had a bluish sheen to begin with. There was absolutely no hint of it initially though. The blueish color remained for the next two years that my friend had the anemone (it was passed on to another person at that point.)

Anyway, I don't have the time to dig up old posts, but I do find that monti CPage101 has to be beautiful! I'd love to not further derail his thread and encourage frequent updates of his monti to see if it continues! NICE!!
 

Cpage101

Corey- 2019 BRS BOD
BRS Member
Officer
#28
I was afraid you would cite that thread. That thread is a wishful theory that feeding a bleached gigantea another healthy gigantean tentacle containing zooxanthellae would bring back the color pigment of the bleached anemone. It has nothing to do with color morphing. To my best knowledge, unless the two different color gignatea sperm/egg combine in such a way that both color can be morph into each other, there's no way you can just "create" a rainbow or whatever you call it anemone.
I also would not feed a bleached anemone with another anemone body parts wishing that it would recover.
Well darn. I'd gotten out of the hobby for a few years since then, but still read quite a bit, and was under the impression that quite a few reputable people have done the zoo transplants (myself included.) That's disappointing. I wouldn't hesitate to introduce zooanthellae to a severely bleached anemone. Give it every chance for survival possible. My blue gig was so sticky that if I inadvertently touched it while maintaining the tank there would be several tentacles stuck to me afterward. Easy donation. Why not, if the donor anemone is healthy? Cannibalism in sea creatures is perfectly normal.

These are the same folks that began methodical treatments for imported gigs and drastically raised the survival rate. I personally observed a super light (bleached) lime green gig exhibit a bluish sheen after we introduced blue tentacles within it's food. Granted the gig may have just regained it's biological color as it regained health and it had a bluish sheen to begin with. There was absolutely no hint of it initially though. The blueish color remained for the next two years that my friend had the anemone (it was passed on to another person at that point.)

Anyway, I don't have the time to dig up old posts, but I do find that monti CPage101 has to be beautiful! I'd love to not further derail his thread and encourage frequent updates of his monti to see if it continues! NICE!!
Thank you I was glad I could be the cause of a very interesting discussion. Nature is a crazy thing


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dz6t

Acro Garden, BRS Sponsor
BRS Member
#29
I was afraid you would cite that thread. That thread is a wishful theory that feeding a bleached gigantea another healthy gigantean tentacle containing zooxanthellae would bring back the color pigment of the bleached anemone. It has nothing to do with color morphing. To my best knowledge, unless the two different color gignatea sperm/egg combine in such a way that both color can be morph into each other, there's no way you can just "create" a rainbow or whatever you call it anemone.
I also would not feed a bleached anemone with another anemone body parts wishing that it would recover.
Well darn. I'd gotten out of the hobby for a few years since then, but still read quite a bit, and was under the impression that quite a few reputable people have done the zoo transplants (myself included.) That's disappointing. I wouldn't hesitate to introduce zooanthellae to a severely bleached anemone. Give it every chance for survival possible. My blue gig was so sticky that if I inadvertently touched it while maintaining the tank there would be several tentacles stuck to me afterward. Easy donation. Why not, if the donor anemone is healthy? Cannibalism in sea creatures is perfectly normal.

These are the same folks that began methodical treatments for imported gigs and drastically raised the survival rate. I personally observed a super light (bleached) lime green gig exhibit a bluish sheen after we introduced blue tentacles within it's food. Granted the gig may have just regained it's biological color as it regained health and it had a bluish sheen to begin with. There was absolutely no hint of it initially though. The blueish color remained for the next two years that my friend had the anemone (it was passed on to another person at that point.)

Anyway, I don't have the time to dig up old posts, but I do find that monti CPage101 has to be beautiful! I'd love to not further derail his thread and encourage frequent updates of his monti to see if it continues! NICE!!
I found the link you posted is scientifically valid and informational.
By feeding a healthy tentacles of same species of anemone, not only zoox can be transplanted and also there is a chance that various Fluorescent proteins can be transferred.
It has been done with giant clam farmings too. They chopped up colorful adult clam and poured the milk shake into the raceway that housing baby clams.




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this is me

I like turtles
BRS Member
#30
Okay.
But the whole feeding anemone with another colored anemone to produce a "Rainbow" anemone is still yet to be proven.
"Rainbow" anemones are produced by LEDs. :D
 
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